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Am very grateful to the distinguished senior senator from New Jersey for joining me again this week to bring attention to the challenges that climate change and rising seas pose for our coastal communities our state's New Jersey and Rhode Island shared the unforgettable experience of superstorm sandy which roared ashore on higher tides and warmer oceans we know in New Jersey and Rhode Island how vulnerable we are as sea levels rise and storms intensify the National Flood Insurance Program should be one of our government's best tools to educate and prepare our communities for the changes that carbon pollution is driving to our coasts but the program falls well short of this basic goal instead of tackling its shortfalls head-on ahead of the next big storm for instance we're getting set to punt again on the Flood Insurance Program my ocean state much smaller than New Jersey has 400 miles of coastline threatened by sea level rise and storm surge flooding so telling homeowners and coastal businesses we'll get to it eventually is not good enough our coastal risk is growing not shrinking a 2021 Zillow chart showed that over 4,800 homes in Rhode Island 4800 families homes valued at nearly 3 billion dollars would be underwater by 2100 using an optimistic assessment of only 6 feet of sea level rise Rhode Island's Coastal Resources Management Council is now planning for our state to see up to 9 to 12 feet of sea level rise by then New Jersey of course has even more at risk with its bigger shoreline with over 93 billion dollars worth of property predicted to fall to rising sea this problem does not wait until the year 2100 it hits earlier it hits as soon as 30-year mortgages and insurance get hard to come by because banks and insures foresee these risks and that inhibits buyers so prices fall perhaps prices even crash as Freddie Mac is predicting last year Gao reported that coastal areas faced particularly high financial risks and that annual coastal property losses from sea level rise that increased storms will run into the billions of dollars every year in the short run and over fifty billion dollars every year by late century Gao pointed to an EPA eof five trillion dollars in economic costs to coastal property from climate change through 2100 our coastal states can't laugh that off because it makes the oil industry uncomfortable to talk about climate change and it is investors creditors appraisers everybody who works coastal markets is taking notice last December credit rating agency Moody's adopted indicators quote to assess the exposure and overall susceptibility of US states to the physical effects of climate change and quote this is Moody's Moody's looks particularly at coasts and at the share of a state's economic activity generated by its coastal communities it counts the homes built on floodplains and it counts the risk of extreme weather damage as a share of the local.